Crispy chicken thighs

For times when you have a research poster to draft, an oral presentation to prepare for, and desperately seeking proof of progress for an upcoming thesis committee meeting all due within a short period of time, this chicken thigh recipe is ideal. From (A)musing Foodie, this is a quick and super simple dish to prepare with only a few simple ingredients.  Another plus, it involves minimal raw chicken contact.  As promised, this recipe produced flavourful chicken thighs with crispy skin.

I replaced garlic salt with garlic powder and mixed it with the kosher salt.  Also, I think I over-drizzled the chicken with olive oil since my apartment smelled like baked chicken oil for the rest of the weekend.  For easy  clean-up, line the baking tray with parchment paper.  You might notice some burnt chicken skin in my picture. Put some foil over the chicken if you starting noticing that the skin is browning up too fast.

Crispy chicken thighs

Crispy chicken thighs 2

 

 

Pinwheels: Deli meat and cheese, crabmeat and veggie

An ideal work potluck would have a lot of variety but, usually, you end up with a lot of dips and salads. Pinwheels are easy to make, can feed a lot of people, not too expensive and potentially impress your fellow co-workers.

I found this simple ham and cheese pinwheel recipe from CenterCutCook. The cream cheese and mayo spread is really appetizing and pairs well with any meat or veggie you might want to add to the wrap.

When you roll the wrap, make sure to make it tight. Chilling it in the fridge also makes it easier to cut up the wrap into pinwheels. One more tip, make sure to buy the freshest tortilla wraps to avoid flaking when you start rolling the pinwheels.

I used basic deli meat (turkey and pepperoni) and provolone cheese for these pinwheels.

IMG_8633.JPG

Or, if you want to be fancier and go for a more gourmet version, you can use crabmeat. (My friend made the crabmeat and veggie pinwheels for his potluck).

IMG_8766.JPG

And if you have vegetarians at the potluck, you can easily make a few meatless wraps. Start with a layer of the cream cheese and mayo spread. Sprinkle some chopped peppers and olives with some shredded cheese on top. Roll it up for a veggie pinwheel.

IMG_8769.JPG

IMG_8764.JPG

Chinese curry chicken thighs

Curry is such an easy meal for students to make as it doesn’t take much prep work to make such a flavor-intense dish. Chinese curry is milder and less-thick as compared to Indian and Thai curry. It’s usually yellow-curry and almost always includes potatoes and some type of meat.

While my mom has made Chinese curry multiple times, asking her to give me a recipe is impossible. Quantities will be described as “a little bit” or “a soup spoonful” and would have included a lot of “sometimes I add this” or “sometimes I would do that”. Instead, I opted to try Adriel’s Chinese Curry Chicken recipe.

I couldn’t find curry paste at the grocery store so I made some based off a curry sauce recipe by only using the dry ingredients. It’s a really simple combination of butter, flour and curry powder.

I used boneless, skinless, whole chicken thighs. I just stewed the meat in the curry about 5-10 minutes longer to make sure it cooked through. I also added frozen vegetables towards the end cause I feel healthier when I add some greens to my meals. Also, instead of slicing the potatoes, I would chop my potatoes into chunks next time so they don’t dissolve as easily.

The Chinese curry dish (even with the make-shift curry paste) was reminiscent of my childhood meals. I would definitely use this recipe again when I get another craving for some good curry.

IMG_8629.JPG

IMG_8630.JPG

Bonus tip: You can use the remaining coconut milk to make a smoothie with frozen mixed berries.

IMG_8627.JPG

Honey Mustard Chicken

Between working a full-time job and finishing up my thesis, I try to limit my big cooking tasks for the weekends.  I like to cook massive portions so that I could eat it throughout the week for lunch. Many people might cringe at the thought of eating the same meal repeatedly but, for me, it ensures that I will bring a lunch to work instead of buying one.

This weekend, I used up my frozen pack of chicken breast by making a Honey Mustard Chicken from Table for Two.   I didn’t plan ahead and forgot to defrost the chicken overnight. Luckily, the kitchn, has a great tip on how to quickly (and safely) thaw chicken breast or any frozen meat by running it under cold water.  For the honey mustard chicken, read the “Disclaimer” section of the recipe for little nuisances that I found helpful. I loved the taste of djion mustard with a hint of sweetness from the sauce.  I used honey instead of maple syrup and added more Dijon cause I had five large chicken breasts to cover. Also, the clean up was easy with the double layers of foil to line the pan.

I served the chicken with spaghetti and a basic tomato sauce by Jamie Oliver.  Looks like it will be chicken leftovers for the next few days which is not always a terrible thing when it’s served with delicious honey mustard glaze.

IMG_8313IMG_8320

Prime rib roast

Being on a graduate student budget means learning how to spot out deals at the grocery store. This week’s special was a prime rib roast. Another bonus, it doesn’t take a lot of ingredients to make a delicious prime rib.

I followed this recipe from The Kitchen Magpie. I also used this cooking time chart for the approximate cooking time. One thing I found difficult was getting the butter to stick to the ends of the roast.  And yes, use the thermometer to determine cooking temperature cause all ovens are made differently. It came out a little more rare than I like but still tasty.  Next time, I might trying using a herb-butter for additional flavour. Also, you can use the drippings to make an easy gravy.  Tip: Check the temperature of the roast before your calculated cooking time to avoid over cooking.

IMG_8297IMG_8298